MOBY "Snow Mob"

If you don't know about the My Own BackYard library program I'm part of, I hope you'll hop over to my MOBY Tab and read about it.

Our three libraries (Marion, Mattapoisett, and Rochester Massachusetts) held simultaneous flash mobs we decided to call "Snow Mobs." 

Here's a sampling of what happened at each of the libraries:

Kids and their families gathered at the libraries to sled on snow piles.

Do a little reading.

Play games.

Decorate and fed the birds.

Test out the snowhoes the library has available for check-out.

And study the perfectly symmetrical snowflakes that decided to fall just for us.


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We have lots of fun programming coming throughout the year. I hope those of you who are local will join us. If you live elsewhere and want to know more about our program, please email me at michelle(at)michellecusolito(dot)com or contact one of the libraries (linked above).

What cool programs are happening at your library?

Snow Investigations

As we hunker down for Winter Storm Nemo here in the Northeast, I thought it might be useful to bring some previous posts about snow fun to your attention.

Of course, good old-fashioned fun such as making snow angels, sledding, snowshoeing and having snowball fights are just as good for your children. But if you want to mix things up a little, try one of these investigations.

None of these require any specialized materials (except a magnifying lens for the snowflake investigation). You probably have everything else you'll need.
  • Snow Fun  describes my kids impromptu snow investigation a couple of years ago. The focus is on properties of snow such as melting. This post will be useful to those of you with young children.
  • More Snow Fun combines Legos and snow investigations. This will be better for older children- especially those who are into building and Legos.
  • Even More Snow Fun describes how to examine snowflakes and notice their shapes. This activity needs to happen while snow is falling. 
Have you tried any of these investigations with your kids/students? Do you have others to suggest?